Men's Pelvic Health

What kind of general pelvic health problems can men experience?

Some pelvic health problems are common to both men and women and some are specific to men only. Diane Wootton, our specialist pelvic health physiotherapist, gets referrals from GPs and consultants for men specific issues alongside the more general pelvic health issues:-

  • Bladder/ urinary incontinence
  • Bowel/ faecal incontinence

See our page for ‘Pelvic Heath for both Men & Women’ for full details on the above topics

What kind of problems are more specific to men?

  • Chronic pelvic pain in men.
  • Enlarged Prostate (BPH: Benign Prostate Hyperplasia)
  • Issues following prostate surgery: Trans-Urethral Resection of the Prostate – TURP (Removal of all or part of the prostate).

Please click on the tabs below to find out more about each of the Men’s pelvic health problems.

Chronic Pelvic Pain in men

Chronic pelvic pain/ Pelvic pain syndrome in men
What is pelvic pain?

Chronic pelvic pain describes a pain men can experience which has lasted longer than 3 months after any possible infection has been ruled out.

Pelvic floor dysfunction in men can be myofascial (i.e. within muscles and tissues) and clients may have some exquisitely tender areas within the muscles known as trigger points.

Where would I feel the pain?
  • Some people have localised pain in the pelvic/ pubic area.
  • Some people have pain radiating out to the pelvic/ abdominal area.
  • A burning sensation on passing urine
  • Increased muscle tension around the pelvic area
Why does it happen?

Chronic pelvic pain may be caused by a number of reasons both bladder and bowel related, but sometimes the pain may have other origins.

One of the origins of this type of pain can be a tightness of the pelvic floor muscles causing them to be held in constant spasm, just like having a permanently clenched fist. This constant tightness then causes a dysfunction of not just the pelvic floor muscles but also other related structures around the pelvic girdle.

How can Physiotherapy help me?

Physiotherapy aims to reduce muscle tension in the pelvic area and calm the tender areas that are ‘too ready’ to send pain signals. These symptoms can respond well if carried out and demonstrated by a specialist pelvic health physiotherapist. This can include (based on Cochrane review recommendations);

  • Massage and stretches
  • Trigger point and muscle tension release techniques
  • Acupuncture
  • Stretches
  • Exercises
  • Manual therapy
  • Coccyx mobilisation
  • Biofeedback
  • Stabilising and strengthening exercises
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Relaxation

Chronic pelvic pain treatment is available by Diane Wootton, our clinical specialist physiotherapist and is usually covered by any Health Insurance policy you may have.

Please call the reception team to book your appointment or call Diane to discuss your particular needs.
Alternatively, you can email Diane directly at: diane.wootton@physiostudio.com for more information.

Prostate problems explained

What is the prostate?

The prostate is part of the male reproductive system. Typically as some men get older, the prostate becomes unusually enlarged which leads to problems related to the flow and control of the bladder. You may have heard it be referred to as BPH: Benign Prostate Hyperplasia. This problem can present like many of the symptoms of bladder or urinary incontinence described above.

Some men may be referred for physiotherapy after an initial diagnosis of BPH to see whether conservative treatment can help control their symptoms.

What is prostate surgery?

Men who are experiencing ongoing problems with bladder incontinence which has not fully resolved with conservative treatment, such as physiotherapy, may be referred to a consultant by their GP for further investigation. The aim of these investigations is to discover whether an enlarged Prostate (BPH) is the source of their symptoms or to find any other underlying causes.

In some, the removal of the prostate is found to relieve their symptoms. This procedure is called a TURP (Trans Urethral Removal of Prostate).

Other reasons for these unresolved symptoms can include a diagnosis of prostate cancer which can then also lead to removal of all or part of the prostate.

Physiotherapy after prostate surgery
Can physiotherapy help?

Men can experience pelvic health problems for the first time following prostate surgery and may not understand that physiotherapy can be an essential part of the after care. It can be an invaluable help during the recovery phase after surgery if you are experiencing any of the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic pain.

Please call the reception team to book your appointment or call Diane to discuss your particular needs.
Alternatively, you can email Diane directly at: diane.wootton@physiostudio.com for more information.

Urge Incontinence after Prostate surgery

Physiotherapy for Urge Incontinence after Prostate surgery

(More detailed information on incontinence can be seen on our Men’s and Women’s pelvic health page….more).

1 in 3 men who have the procedure may develop a strong sense of urgency i.e. an urgent desire to pass urine which sometimes causes some urinary leakage. This occurs because the bladder muscle is set to being ‘too ready to go’ as the prostate prevented leakage by its sheer bulk before surgery. Drugs prescribed by your consultant can improve these symptoms. This usually resolves by 6 months.

Alternatively, your consultant may also decide to refer you to our physiotherapist Diane Wootton who can teach and advise on specifically tailored pelvic floor exercises that can help with these ongoing symptoms.

Please call the reception team to book your appointment or call Diane to discuss your particular needs.
Alternatively, you can email Diane directly at: diane.wootton@physiostudio.com for more information.

Stress incontinence after Prostate surgery

Physiotherapy for Stress Incontinence following surgery

(More detailed information on incontinence can be seen on our Men and Women’s pelvic health pages…more).

Rarely, in less than 1 in 30 men, the muscle mechanism that controls the flow is damaged by TURP surgery leading to incontinence on activity.

Your consultant may refer you to our physiotherapist Diane Wootton who can teach and advise on specifically tailored pelvic floor exercises to help with the management these ongoing symptoms. These problems usually resolves within 6 months of surgery. In the most severe cases, another operation may be needed to reduce leakage.

Please call the reception team to book your appointment or call Diane to discuss your particular needs.
Alternatively, you can email Diane directly at: diane.wootton@physiostudio.com for more information.